52 Rolls Week 27:52

My Blog followers know that during a Tennis Grand Slam, I can disappear for a while……And So I was up early to Watch the Wimbledon Ladies Final…….

But I have been busy this week, and actually developed the last four rolls from my recent B&W workshop:

Darkroomtime

However, no time this week to scan them…maybe later today.  So I will share with you an image from my recent Salt Printing Workshop.  Estes Park, Rocky Mountains.  Longs Peak on the left:

SaltWorkshopResults006

Salt Printing (aka the printing out process) is something that I will NEVER do again!  None of my negatives worked… So I had to use one of the instructor’s ‘found’ negatives (wet plate collodion) that she got at a photo flea market………I learned from this experience that WetPlate Collodion negatives are what you need, and that’s a process I have no interest in pursuing.  Also apparently, the digital negative techniques for other alternative process are not good enough for Salt Printing. And on and on….I’ll stop whining now and direct you to Jacqueline Webster’s site.  She was the instructor and she’s the expert here……not me.

But we still love you Fox Talbot, for “Inventing the (Paper) Negative”…….. which of course led to modern film photography.  Something we ought to pay tribute to in the 52 Rolls Project.

Tech Info: Salt Print Synopsis:

  • art paper coated first with warm gelatin & dried; can be stored (Day 1)
  • then coated with silver chloride (or ammonium chloride) salts & dried (must be used immediately) (Day 2)
  • wet plate collodion negative (preferred)
  • exposed in full sunlight for ~30 minutes
  • wash in chlorinated tap water
  • gold toner (can also be combined with fixer)
  • fix with sodium thiosulfate
  • wash 20 minutes
  • Beeswax coating for protection

And if this doesn’t sound tortuous enough…check out more Alternative Processes.

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2 thoughts on “52 Rolls Week 27:52

  1. It will certainly remind you to be absolutely meticulous in darkroom prep. And we are building a UV light box. ButI’ll probably stick with van dyke and cyanotypes. Getting the right negatives for those processes is easier.

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